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Listening to Music while training


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I enjoy listening to music during my flexibility/mobility/stretching/limbering/etc. sessions, which can amount to 2hrs long per day. It's the one thing that changes from workout to workout, and helps keep me motivated to do the same exercises every day.

 

From listening to the coffee shop conversations, awareness is highly touted, and is considered the primary focus. Do you listen to music during your sessions? Is listening to music a "distraction", hindering my cultivation of awareness?

 

Thanks,

Alex

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I'm sure this depends on your personality and the type of music, among other factors. Personally, I don't listen to music during my sessions. I think only you will be able to answer this question - is it hindering your awareness? But perhaps more important is the fact that listening to music keeps you motivated. Consistency and enjoyment will surely trump seeking the optimal when that results in less of those two things.

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There are specifics, largely to do with one's stage of practice. The guidelines I follow are as such:

Partner Stretching - no!

Solo Stretching - no

Movement play - possibly, me personally no.

Strength work - yes (though only instrumental music).

DW

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Death Metal is also acceptable listening when doing strength training!

 

Personally I find music drowns out much of the nicer noise coming from my environment (internal and external), which I'd rather listen to. I may experiment with having music as a distraction present and specifically maintaining awareness despite the distraction, but at this stage it is a little much.

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  • 3 months later...

Well, I can tell you that Steeldriver's "Peacemaker" ("I'm three cool pounds of cold blue steel") really helped when I was doing all that ballistic insanity... and awareness can be both directed and divided, with enough practise. For most people who do not have this training, music is simply a distraction from the work at hand.

 

Generally, no music for me while doing my personal daily practise or, if the body is sore (quite often in my case), then the right kind of female vocals can really help, but only as an occasional thing. And Nathan's point is well put, too.

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