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Craig's Hanging Series


Craig

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https://vimeo.com/on...d/hangingseries

Part 1 - Passive Hanging (now available)

Part 2 - Active Hanging (now available)

Part 3 - Arching Hangs (coming soon)

Part 4 - 1 Arm Hangs (coming soon)

Purchasing the entire series now will give you automatic access to the new parts when they are added, or you can purchase them all separately as they come out. Something in these for everyone I feel, I've shown some of these variation to seasoned hangers, and they've gotten something out of it.

Any questions, please post here! Also, this entire thing was produced/edited/set up/etc by me, so if you have any feedback or tips, I would welcome it. Let me know what you think of the format and presentation!

Cheers,

Craig (aka Mountain Hammer)

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I made a new trailer that's heaps better and shows some of what the program has in store (including some sneak peaks of what parts 3 and 4 will be all about :D)

does everyone prefer this new type of trailer?

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I like it! I'm planning to get at least part 2 as soon as I am able to transfer some funds to my paypal account.

Just a question though. I'm trying out ways to increase my shoulder stability to correct a stubborn pain in my long head of biceps tendon, and I'm currently doing mostly elastic band exercises for the rotator cuff and the like. Would you recommend these exercises, in such a situation, or they might be a bit too strong for use in the "pre-hab/re-hab" phase?

Thanks!

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Definitely the active hangs from part 2 can help, especially exploring the different grip positions and finding which one or two positions help with your specific problem. Only time I wouldn't suggest this is if you are in pain during any part of the hang. Never work through pain (although you should definitely be working through some discomfort - understanding the difference between pain and discomfort is a highly desirable skill)

Using part 1 for this might depend on the state of your shoulders. Do they easily dislocate, or any similar instabilities? If so, you might want to stock to the active stuff until they are a bit stronger, and only hit the passive hangs after. If you can manage the passive hangs, they are extremely beneficial in helping with the release of excess tension, especially for long periods of a time with high volume (and the mindset mentioned in the clip!)

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does everyone prefer this new type of trailer?

I think showing actual bits improves general reception and is more likely to convince potential buyers, if you want you can still make a combo and include your spoken bits in between or at the end to reach to the ones that want to see spoken word ;).

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Sweet thanks! The piece to camera always feels a bit artificial to me so I'm never quite comfortable. I was thinking of writing an article explaining in further depth the various practises and theoretical parts. Would that be something you would like to see?

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Thanks Joachim! My plan is to update and add to these over time as well, as I learn new exercises and understand the exercises and technology processes more thoroughly, so please leave feedback!

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Will do Craig. 2 months ago I dislocated my shoulder, although not completely as it popped back in. There's no pain but it very uncomfortable and my brain is still not comfortable with large ROM in controlled circles etc. my dislocates etc. are back to square 1 - which is fine, Ill build back stronger.

I'm gonna take a very slow and start with supported active hangs for at least a few months I think. And my general back strength work will be active hangs, barbell rows, deadlifs and ringrows for now and slowly work on getting my stable overhead pressing back.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Great stuff, Craig. About three months ago I started force feeding my brain with daily sessions of 10 to 20 reps of standing on my hands (30 to 60 seconds per rep gently tapping the wall with my feet; 6 to 7 times a week aiming for 5 to 10 min.s on my hands per session). The idea is to remap my brain so I can get comfortable in an upside-down balanced position (with my COG over the palm of my hands, emulating a pencil from the shoulders up). Inspired by your hanging series, I am now including active one arm hangs between the HS reps. I expect that a little stretching of the wrist, shoulders, back etc. after each HS will help. Next time, you are in Amsterdam we should go out for a beer. My treat.

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Thanks Fritz! I'm going to take you up on that offer next year :D

You definitely should do that. I understand you are planning to visit The Netherlands. Give me a pre-warning (my e-mail address in is the customer list, I think), so we can arrange something.

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Also let me know how the hs/1ah combination goes. Sounds like a great way to do things

I will. It is early days now. I tested my one-arm-hanging capacity and found that the skin on my ands are the limiting factor. After 2 minutes of RH 15 sec, LH 15 sec, RH 15 sec etc. I stopped because I need my hands to stay whole. So, 1 min. of 1 hand hanging between hand stand reps is fine and feels very good (especially on the wrists). To keep the hanging more interesting, I mix it up with reps of 20 sec passive 2 hand hang + 20 sec active arched hang + 20 sec passive hang. We will see where this all leads to.

Cheers

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Great stuff, Craig. About three months ago I started force feeding my brain with daily sessions of 10 to 20 reps of standing on my hands (30 to 60 seconds per rep gently tapping the wall with my feet; 6 to 7 times a week aiming for 5 to 10 min.s on my hands per session). The idea is to remap my brain so I can get comfortable in an upside-down balanced position (with my COG over the palm of my hands, emulating a pencil from the shoulders up). Inspired by your hanging series, I am now including active one arm hangs between the HS reps. I expect that a little stretching of the wrist, shoulders, back etc. after each HS will help. Next time, you are in Amsterdam we should go out for a beer. My treat.

Frits, I am wondering what exactly your method is when tapping the wall with your feet? I am curious... having just done Yuri's workshop, maybe there are some ideas that will help you get balancing more comfortably, if you are interested.

I think one arm hangs will detract from the balance goal (skill work) as they are too taxing.

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Frits, I am wondering what exactly your method is when tapping the wall with your feet? I am curious... having just done Yuri's workshop, maybe there are some ideas that will help you get balancing more comfortably, if you are interested.

I think one arm hangs will detract from the balance goal (skill work) as they are too taxing.

Yes, I am definitely interested and would appreciate any pointers.

I get into a hand stand with my fingers (my back is to the wall) as close as possible to the wall and then concentrate on staying away from the wall with the heels of my feet (keeping my feet together). So, each time I feel my heels brush against the wall, I concentrate on 1) pointing my toes and tightening my legs and glutes more, 2) extending my shoulders more, 3) tightening my arms, and 4) , if necessary, pressing with my fingers until I feel my COG shift to over the palms of my hands. I stay in my HS as long as possible, because I have noticed that, after having been on my hands for, say, 40 seconds (i.e. when getting tired), I can feel my COG stay over the palm of my hand and the”urge” to get back on my feet has almost disappeared.

Hanging by one hand does not tire me at all. It gives a really nice stretch and my wrists feel ready to go again.

Cheers.

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Oh yes, re hanging, forgot you were a climber! I would still argue not do them and engage with the HS work more... or ask the question - what is the reason especially in regards to the balance goal?

I would do the exact opposite in approaching this as to what you are doing ie 4,3,2,1 above, move away from reps/sets/time focus. I would concentrate on moving to where you want the balance point in the hands from different positions (chest/back to wall, from mexican back to wall etc), using the different re-balancing techniques, hands being primary. Then continue isolated work (eg effect of should adjustments) and each time checking the effect on balance. Build the reflexes with a more active (mentally), varied, isolated techniques, relax on the straight line considerations and relax a bit generally. ie move from 'gymnastic approach' to 'handbalancer approach'.

Oh also, to reduce reliance on the wall. A drill I am doing is to kick up into handstand against the wall with the only goal to not touch the wall.

How are your kick up and bail?

I would watch all of Yuri's videos and read his material and casually try all of the drills a few times each - but do this in a short period of time. My comments are from beginner perspective only... but Yuri shifted my approach away from what sounds like a similar approach to what you have and I have found my path to comfortable balance quickly as a result & much more profitable building of the balance reflexes I think.

The main advice and maybe the only bit of genuine value, is just to check and do Yuri's material: all of it!

Sorry for the hijack Craig :P

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Also, my apologies to Craig, even if, "hanging" between HS's was what started it all :).

I would do the exact opposite in approaching this as to what you are doing ie 4,3,2,1 above, move away from reps/sets/time focus. I would concentrate on moving to where you want the balance point in the hands from different positions (chest/back to wall, from mexican back to wall etc), using the different re-balancing techniques, hands being primary. Then continue isolated work (eg effect of should adjustments) and each time checking the effect on balance. Build the reflexes with a more active (mentally), varied, isolated techniques, relax on the straight line considerations and relax a bit generally. ie move from 'gymnastic approach' to 'handbalancer approach'.

Oh also, to reduce reliance on the wall. A drill I am doing is to kick up into handstand against the wall with the only goal to not touch the wall.

How are your kick up and bail?

I would watch all of Yuri's videos and read his material and casually try all of the drills a few times each - but do this in a short period of time. My comments are from beginner perspective only... but Yuri shifted my approach away from what sounds like a similar approach to what you have and I have found my path to comfortable balance quickly as a result & much more profitable building of the balance reflexes I think.

The main advice and maybe the only bit of genuine value, is just to check and do Yuri's material: all of it!

Sorry for the hijack Craig :P

Thanks for the good pointers. The program, I am following is not a reps/sets program. Currently, I can spend 5 to 10 min.s on my hands, and it takes 5 to 20 reps. That is it. Following your suggestions though, I do intend, in addition to the program I am following, to mix it up and try to find different approaches to finding my balance.

I am an average bailer who at times uses his climbing helmet if sudden collapse is a possibility (e.g. when doing a one handed HS against the wall for time). I am also not worried about being able to wean myself from using the wall as a prop once I reach that point (i.e. I do the same as you; each time I kick up, I try to stay away from the wall).

I looked for more of Yuri's info, and found the following, that nicely summarizes what I am after:

“Regular 'point your toes' or 'extend your shoulders' tips didn't do it for me or helped getting "IT" of hand balancing. I wanted to get to the very foundation of the concept for balance and I figured it out after years of looking into my own inner body and is the first thing that I try to explain to every new individual who starts to train with me and wants to know about technique. My understanding of what balance is before technique comes in, as circular vibration of micro movements or reactions of the muscles throughout your body when upside down in order to remain in that middle point where the gravity has no influence and staying there.”

I also was delighted to find the following video by Yuri (look at 4 min.s into the video):

Cheers

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