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The "Sensible Eating" article, written for Stretching & Pregnancy

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13 hours ago, nick_kuchedav said:

Hopefully you will find something helpfull in my post. After probably an year I manage to post it.

Lots of good stuff there. A lot I agree with, and some not so much, but likely a result of wording for the most part. As a general overall comment, I will say that a good number of your points of contention seem to be largely a matter of audience, i.e. who the advice is meant for (and what are their goals). I am sure Kit will comment on that, and I may come back with some of my thoughts if anything remains after Kit has addressed your points.

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5 hours ago, Nathan said:

. A lot I agree with, and some not so much, but likely a result of wording for the most part.

Great, buddy! I would be happy to hear "not so much" part, when you have time :) 

But for sure context is really important, and this is the biggest change in my dietary approach for the last few years- I still believe/support almost the same things as a few years ago, but now I consider how to present my tips and the amount of info way more.

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20 hours ago, nick_kuchedav said:

For some circles gluten is just fashion for me there is something there.

Could you please expand on that?

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41 minutes ago, jaja said:

Could you please expand on that?

Have you read this book: https://www.amazon.com/Grain-Brain-Surprising-Sugar-Your-Killers/dp/031623480X 

From what I've seen the amount of damage that the gluten cased is measured mainly by an acute immune reaction and GI distress. There are a lot of talks about this topic from the Paleo Diet Crowd.

I also understand that there are many unreliable sources but Perlmutter and Tom O'bryan I think are on the right track.

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Nick, all good from me.

Can readers of this thread keep in mind that the article that started this thread was written a long time ago, and as a short introduction to principles of nutrition for women contemplating pregnancy. No mention of recommendation for men's diets was made there, IIRC. And my recommendation of 70g/day was just that: a recommendation. More definitely would not be a dis-benefit.

Re. your point 4: I know this, and I know that you know I know this—if you read the article I wrote on ketogenic diets:

https://stretchtherapy.net/do-you-want-to-diet-dont/

I think that point is made. And I would counter-argue that 99%+ of the readers of Stretching & Pregnancy are conditioned to function on glucose; I do not recommend this myself.

I agree completely re. saturated fats as I mentioned before; I was attempting to steer a nutritional 'middle ground' and at that time saturated fats were regarded as the work of the devil by most writers and researchers; remember the book is about exercise primarily. I wanted readers who do not have our kind of body connection to really think about what they put in their mouths—that was the main purpose. Please remember that the idea of "calorie dense–nutritionally sparse" was brand new then, too.

Re. your point 8: I knew from Jennifer that significant weight gain is a constant fear in pregnant women, hence that note.

Re. point 9: yes, but the general point is sound.

Agree on your points re. cholesterol 100%.

Re. point 10: do we write a general simple chapter, or do we write a diet book? I know there are exceptions to most of the points I make, but in general they are sound. Same for your objection to betacarotene and vitamin D; of course supplement this if you live far enough North—this was written in Australia, for Australians.

I agree with your fish oil recommendations and your ranking of carbohydrates. I would change this for vegetarians.

Re. gluten: a significant fraction of the population do have a problem with this (and a bigger problem with lectins) so I take your objection to grains (and beans, too) on board. In this aspect, each person has to try these foods for themselves to see how they react—AFAIK, there is no way to do that without personal experimentation.

My recommendation re. nuts I still stand by (particularly for vegetarians), if only for the variety of the fats contained. I was not thinking then of their protein content so much.

On TFAs, though—what are the beneficial ones? My source of information on TFAs came from Udo Erasmus's book (Fats that heal, fats that kill). 

Considering now the points made by @pogo69, @Nathan, and @nick_kuchedav, why don't you three collaborate on rewriting that article, and I will post it as a supplement and as a new article here? We can highlight just how much has changed informationally in the time that has passed since its first publication.

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On 11/9/2018 at 8:05 AM, Kit_L said:

I agree with your fish oil recommendations and your ranking of carbohydrates. I would change this for vegetarians.

I agree, with caveat.

It would be far preferable for people to obtain their omega-3 from oily fish.  There is a wealth of research that demonstrates far greater benefit from fish, than from omega-3 supplements alone.  Seafood is also very nutrient dense, with respect to essential minerals.

But for those who cannot (seafood can be very expensive, if you're not catching it yourself), supplementation can be useful.

On 11/9/2018 at 8:05 AM, Kit_L said:

Re. gluten: a significant fraction of the population do have a problem with this (and a bigger problem with lectins) so I take your objection to grains (and beans, too) on board. In this aspect, each person has to try these foods for themselves to see how they react—AFAIK, there is no way to do that without personal experimentation.

As is the case for many intolerances.  Gluten, lactose, casein, nightshades, FODMAPS, etc.  If you're experiences unexplained, high inflammation, it costs comparatively little to eliminate potential stressors for a while.

On 11/9/2018 at 8:05 AM, Kit_L said:

My recommendation re. nuts I still stand by (particularly for vegetarians), if only for the variety of the fats contained. I was not thinking then of their protein content so much.

Agreed.  All things in moderation, as they say.  Nuts can be valuable sources of minerals, particularly for vegetarians.

On 11/9/2018 at 8:05 AM, Kit_L said:

On TFAs, though—what are the beneficial ones? My source of information on TFAs came from Udo Erasmus's book (Fats that heal, fats that kill).

There are naturally occurring TFA, such as CLA (conjugated linoleic acid), in dairy and meat from grass-fed ruminants.  It is, in the modest amounts consumed via these foods, of benefit to health.

The main issue with TFA from processed foods, is the vast quantities in which we can now consume them.  Moderation and (highly) processed food are largely incompatible.

 

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