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It's interesting, definitely. Yet I cannot see how this will make any major impact on how we train/play—it seems to me that by avoiding repetitive movements like cycling and jogging, and doing the kind of running, jumping, and hanging/pushing that most of us already do simply favours these newly uncovered systems. But we already "knew" this, in a sense, didn't we, and from other data?

I am reminded of all the brouhaha surrounding the 'discovery' of the Higgs boson: it made zero difference to our understanding of physics at the human scale, and the force of gravity. A closer and closer look at anything, hardly surprisingly, yields finer and finer details. New technologies that resolve more finely than older technologies always seem to find smaller/finer details.

Personally, the discovery of this "goo" is interesting because it is so consistent with the new fluid model of fascia, shown spectacularly here:

Every practitioner (and anyone interested in their bodies) can learn from watching this. And Robert Schleip told me that fascia has a half-life of six months so, effectively, if you change your exercise regime to favour fascia, you can have a new fascia body in two years or so.

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I am reminded of all the brouhaha surrounding the 'discovery' of the Higgs boson: it made zero difference to our understanding of physics at the human scale, and the force of gravity. A closer and closer look at anything, hardly surprisingly, yields finer and finer details. New technologies that resolve more finely than older technologies always seem to find smaller/finer details.

I think this kind of discovery (the Higgs boson) is more about 'pure research'. Discovery for the sake of discovery, which I feel is severely lacking in modern research. While taken in isolation, it seems largely irrelevant. But once you take many small pieces and start assembling a larger puzzle, incredible things start to reveal themselves.

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