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Hey there guys,

I've came across a video thanks to YouTube algorithms, and after watching it and doing some research I'm pretty sure I have hip retro-version, in other words a lot of external rotation on my hips and very limited internal rotation.  A while ago, I tried some routines to improve mobility/flexibility for squats and I hurt my hips a little by doing internal rotation work that were very like the L7: seated figure and L8:inside squat from the master the squat series. I can barely rotate my hips internally without getting them off the ground like it should be in the L7, if I try, it's very uncomfortable (not in a stretchy way).

So my question is: should I just give up on doing internal rotation work, or do it by the very limited range of motion that I have in my hips? Note that they're completely healed now, as it wasn't anything very serious, but i don't know if I can improve a lot by doing that kind of work, since it's more of a structural body issue rather than a flexibility issue.

I know that I have to listen to my body, and it's kinda telling me to not do internal rotation stretches/mobility work, just want to really know if I should stop doing them or doing them in a very limited wa

On another note, while doing/experimenting with the standing piriformis stretch I don't feel anything getting stretched while I feel it in the seated piriformis, could it be because of this hip retroversion (because boy, I'm tight so it's weird to do a stretch and not feel any intensity from it)?

 

(Btw this is the video that I came across upon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubdIGnX2Hfs)



Cheers,
João

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7 hours ago, João Pedro said:

I know that I have to listen to my body, and it's kinda telling me to not do internal rotation stretches/mobility work, just want to really know if I should stop doing them or doing them in a very limited wa

@João Pedro: the problem I see in the YT videos (have a look at this one, too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNtBBV-DcBI) is that it is not possible to tell if the limitations are  structural (properties of the bony alignment of the hip joint and knee, or simple muscle tension (in a lack of range of movement sense). Those tests really only show the range of movement patterns being displayed by the tested people at the time of testing, and not what the deeper causes might be. 

In my experience, ROM can be improved hugely, if pursued carefully and over time. Most people's external rotators (the muscles that limit internal rotation) are tight, and when such a person tries exercises like the figure 4, their knees protest because the lack of external rotator length does not allow the hip to move that way—so lateral forces are created at the knee. And in my experience, the deeper reason for people having trouble with the inside squat is that their support leg is not strong enough to hold the body's weight as the movement is explored.

Leave both exercises alone for a while and try again in a month or two, and focus on lengthening the external rotators with the exercises you know. The seated piriformis exercises (where the folded knee is brought into the opposite shoulder) placed no strain on the knee, and in time can facilitate this movement.

 

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Thanks Kit! I will keep on working on my squats leaving both exercises out of my routine for a while and then I'll try them later on and see what I feel about it!

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