Jump to content
lancetcomstock

Front splits exercises outer hamstring

Recommended Posts

I’ll just recap my experience with the bent knee hamstring stretch. 1st thing was I was feeling the stretch at the back of the knee, the 2nd thing that was happening during the bent knee hamstring stretch; my hip flexor also began to fire up and contract while doing it, especially as I tried to keep my belly in contact with my thigh and stick my butt out. I don't know why it's contracting, at first I thought maybe it was because I did the hip flexor exercise prior to the hamstring exercise, and it started firing up because it went from a deep stretch and then directly into an agonistic position. But last night I did all 3 sets of the hamstring exercise first and then hip flexor exercise, and it still fired up. See video below for form check. Thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,

Welcome to the forums! I'm not sure what happened with your font colors in the original post, but I changed them to default because the text was rather difficult to read. Also, I moved your post to the form check forum.

It's really difficult to see what's going on with the angle of your video. A side view would be much better. (Also, please upload the video to YouTube or some other hosting site. Uploading images and audio here is generally fine, but video files should be linked to. See forum rule #3.) That said, the reason your hip flexor is firing is because you're not holding the leg to your belly/chest with your arm, so the hip flexor is, well... flexing the hip :lol: Wrap your arm under the leg and use the arm to keep the leg in contact with your torso if you want to let your hip flexor relax.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Liv wasn't holding her leg to her chest in the video so I was just mimicking what she was doing, although I've seen Kit do that in other videos before so I did try that, and it still felt like it my hip flexor was cramping, I don't know...my body doesn't always comply lol Maybe I wasn't holding it snug enough. Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No worries. You don't have to hold the leg if you don't mind the hip flexor working, but if it's cramping then hold the leg firmly to the torso with your arm and see how that works. You may still be trying to use the hip flexor even when holding the leg, so consciously allow the hip flexor to relax and let your arm do the work. Let us know how it goes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so I didn't film last night but I did Olivias slow flow class for hip flexor and piriformus, and I did the bonus content on outer hammies, and I did see an improvement when I wrapped my arm around my hamstring and pulled myself closer to my thigh, making my belly touch my thigh. However, there was still my quad activating a little bit. But actually it feels more like a cramp than a quad activation. That's probably more accurate to what I'm experiencing than what I said before (my quads firing), because it is very uncomfortable like a cramp and I have to come out of the position for it to go away. I'll send a video tomorrow when I get home, maybe it is something in my alignment, but when I followed Olivias cues in the video, there was less cramping. how can I fix this? It starts cramping up right when I'm feeling an amazing stretch in my outer hammies 🤣

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, lancetcomstock said:

However, there was still my quad activating a little bit. But actually it feels more like a cramp than a quad activation. That's probably more accurate to what I'm experiencing than what I said before (my quads firing), because it is very uncomfortable like a cramp and I have to come out of the position for it to go away.

Activating in a shortened position is what usually causes cramping. So the fact remains that you are using your quad to close the angle. Try pulling your heel to your butt on one leg. You can probably get pretty close. Now let go of your foot but keep the heel where it is. You're almost certainly going to fail, and you're probably going to cramp trying. It's the same idea.

There's not a lot to say until we see the video, but I will just add that cramping will stop in time. Instead of coming out of the cramp - let it cramp. It may feel like torture (go ahead and push your limits, but be reasonable too), but the cramp will usually fade after a bit. (This can produce soreness in the following days, so don't do this if you need to avoid soreness for some reason.) Once you've done this a few times, the cramping will begin to lose intensity until, eventually, it will likely stop. Until you push into new cramping ranges :) (It will also stop as your hammies loosen up, because the quad will not have to work as hard to stretch them.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, there's no reason that I need avoid soreness, but I wonder if the cramping causing soreness in my hip flexors and quads would just make me tight again in my hip flexors after spending all that time stretching my hip flexors and quads? Maybe it's not enough time to really be counter productive but perhaps I'll just do the hamstring exercises first and then the hip flexors and quad stretches lol. And I've said this 3 times now, but I'm going get that video today haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link to the video. (It was broken, but I found the video on your user page and fixed the link.)

11 hours ago, lancetcomstock said:

I wonder if the cramping causing soreness in my hip flexors and quads would just make me tight again in my hip flexors after spending all that time stretching my hip flexors and quads?

Don't worry about that. It may cause perceived tightness, but it's not going to cause any real regression. Feel free to swap the order around however you like, though.

As for the video, it's hard to tell, but it doesn't look like your arm is actually doing a whole lot. Or your transfer of effort from the hip flexors to the arm is super duper ultra smooth :lol: Use the arm before reaching your end-range position and pull yourself into it with the arm - not the hip flexors. You might put something thick (folded up blanket, etc.) under the leg for more leverage if you find it difficult to create enough force.

What I see is you moving fully into position without the arm (i.e. preparing the hip flexors nicely for oncoming cramping) and then just kind of putting it in place as a token "please don't cramp" gesture ;) I could be wrong, but try using the arm to pull yourself into position and let the hip flexors release as much effort as possible well before you reach that fully folded point. See if that makes a difference.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Nathan said:

Thanks for the link to the video. (It was broken, but I found the video on your user page and fixed the link.)

Don't worry about that. It may cause perceived tightness, but it's not going to cause any real regression. Feel free to swap the order around however you like, though.

As for the video, it's hard to tell, but it doesn't look like your arm is actually doing a whole lot. Or your transfer of effort from the hip flexors to the arm is super duper ultra smooth :lol: Use the arm before reaching your end-range position and pull yourself into it with the arm - not the hip flexors. You might put something thick (folded up blanket, etc.) under the leg for more leverage if you find it difficult to create enough force.

What I see is you moving fully into position without the arm (i.e. preparing the hip flexors nicely for oncoming cramping) and then just kind of putting it in place as a token "please don't cramp" gesture ;) I could be wrong, but try using the arm to pull yourself into position and let the hip flexors release as much effort as possible well before you reach that fully folded point. See if that makes a difference.

 

Speechless.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/6/2019 at 4:05 PM, Nathan said:

pull yourself into it with the arm - not the hip flexors

That's the problem exactly. So, way before the thigh comes in contact with the chest, take a breath in and stop—let everything go limp, and only then use the arm to pull the chest onto the leg. If the HF still cramps, change legs immediately, and keep changing them, if necessary. At some point, the brain will get the idea, "Ah: I don't need to cramp!".

And, definitely, move more slowly. And welcome to the forums!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...