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AlexanderEgebak

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Since there is so many gems in the subforum I thought I would like to share my own ones. For context I am a physiotherapy student with a big interest in pain science, stress, performance and stretching. Here are my favorite reading materials:

Books:

- Explain Pain: Supercharged: Lorimer G. Moseley, David Butler. This book literally takes you through everything you need to know about pain and adresses a lot of misconceptions as well. The book is written in a very informal jargon which eases up the burden of grasping some of the "hold onto your hats" topics like pain immunology. Anecdotes are provided along the way to maintain your attention and focus and might provide a smile once in a while. References are always provided. The books ends of with pain metaphors which you can use to explain pain in a simple manner to patients. The book is readable both for professionals and the "smart" patient.

- Therapeutic Neuroscience Education: Adriaan Louw, Emilio Puentedura: Compared to EPS this book is designed for educating people about pain. The structure is comprised of a pain questionaire which challenges your current pain understand and then proceeds to give elaborate answers as to why things are the way they are. The illustrations are top-notch here and the book can be used both by clinicians and the majority of patients. As well, the book contains unique metaphors to add to your library.

- The Upside of Stress: Why Stress Is Good For You And How To Get Good At It: Kelly McGonigal: This book is a gem in itself. It challenges the myth of stress being bad for you and explains how the research have developed since Hans Selye did his rat experiments to conclude that stress was a negative entity. The book is rich in humor and metaphors and still reviews and comments on scientific studies without losing the reader. As well, this book also works as a handbook of stress management by providing tools and models for the reader to reconceptualize and manage stress.

- Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers: Robert Sapolsky. This is the stress book for people interested in the biology and physiology of stress. This book takes the reader through a lot of very interesting and humorous anecdotes about stress and how stress is not as simple or as bad as it has been portrayed by the media, certain authors and clinicians. The light-hearted tone of this book makes sure that suddenly half way through the book you end up thinking "Hey, I did used to disagree with that, right brain?" Sapolsky has my best recommendations.

- Kit Laughlin's books: Instead of writing a long summary I will try to keep it short. I prefer books when I want to really dive into a topic. Kit's books have a lot of superb exercises accumulated through many years of trial and error and through interactions with many other stretching professionals. As well, the biomechanical and physiological explanations are provided en masse which is a huge bonus for me. I like having the books in front of me, and anyone interested in stretching who also likes reading books, should definitively buy them.

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Yet another excellent reading list!

I'd love to get my hands on a copy of 'Explain Pain: Supercharged' one day, but I'd prefer not to have to sell a kidney or one of my kids, to do so.

Although they don't have EPS, I did just discover that my local library has a copy of both Explain Pain, and Painful Yarns.  Small win!

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I've gathered that, from various reviews/opinions.

Oh well, I suppose I only really NEED one kidney.

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Adding now to my list:

- Dermo Neuro Modulation: Diana Jacobs. Diana has been doing her research in biology, psychology, manual therapy and neuroscience and have applied the knowledge she has acquired to manual therapy and touch and general. She has some very interesting theories about why manual therapy is so popular and helpful to people despite the evidence for it being bad. She will discuss everything from nerve mobilization, to social grooming, to "fascial release", to pain, to placebo/nocebo, to clinical reasoning for the use of manual therapy. She can really put an argument for manual therapy forward in a scientific persuasive way discussing the plausibilities of specific touch effects on pain.

- Recovery Strategies: Gregory Lehman. Gregory is doctor of biomechanics under Stuart McGill and has since been reconciling the important parts of biomechanics in pain management and performance training. He is a very bright guy and can provide references for everything that he does. He has since graduating taken up courses in neuroscience so that his understand of pain is up to date as well. He runs a series of workshops around the world. The best part is that an online version  of the book is free!

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On 8/15/2018 at 3:12 AM, AlexanderEgebak said:

Adding now to my list:

- Dermo Neuro Modulation: Diana Jacobs. Diana has been doing her research in biology, psychology, manual therapy and neuroscience and have applied the knowledge she has acquired to manual therapy and touch and general. She has some very interesting theories about why manual therapy is so popular and helpful to people despite the evidence for it being bad. She will discuss everything from nerve mobilization, to social grooming, to "fascial release", to pain, to placebo/nocebo, to clinical reasoning for the use of manual therapy. She can really put an argument for manual therapy forward in a scientific persuasive way discussing the plausibilities of specific touch effects on pain.

- Recovery Strategies: Gregory Lehman. Gregory is doctor of biomechanics under Stuart McGill and has since been reconciling the important parts of biomechanics in pain management and performance training. He is a very bright guy and can provide references for everything that he does. He has since graduating taken up courses in neuroscience so that his understand of pain is up to date as well. He runs a series of workshops around the world. The best part is that an online version  of the book is free!

Both of these are excellent. I have been 'playing' with DNM for a little while now - it is very interesting. 

 

 

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On ‎8‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 9:21 AM, dannyg said:

Both of these are excellent. I have been 'playing' with DNM for a little while now - it is very interesting. 

 

 

Would you care to post some of your experience with it? I am friends with Diana on facebook, but never had the opportunity to attend a workshop or talk with a practitioner face to face

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