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Kino's hip injury - a few little lessons in there


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Many of you will have seen (and maybe marvelled at) videos of Kino from Kino Yoga.

 

Here's an interesting article, for those interested in overworking themselves, commercialisation, narcissism, and a few other things.

 

https://yogainternational.com/article/view/kinos-hip-reflections-on-extreme-practice-and-injury-in-asana

 

(hope you can see it; you may have to set up a - free - account).

 

Jim.

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Thanks, good article. 

But can you do such extreme training and be free of injuries?

By the way, I don´t think this only happens in yoga. It´s not the first time that I see a well-known-in-internet trainer confessing that he has been injured for months.

And usually they confess it when they are about to recover.

On the other hand, if that´s the way you earn your living It´s logical that some people hide their injuries.

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Reading that whole article, and looking at the title of the author's other articles, I can't help feeling that the author has an agenda. I infer he feels advanced Yoga is inherently dangerous. I will counter with Mell Siff's famous dictum: "There are no dangerous exercises; only dangerous ways of doing exercises."

 

I have injured myself dozens of times; no, more, probably. How else are you going to find whether limits are real, or simply fear and projection? And my R hamstring attachment has been very sore for months – so what? Past experience shows it will get better, and I will learn something from it. Yesterday, for example, I designed a new ball-and-table stretch/rolling sequence that appears to be helping; all the things that have happened to me along the way that have taught me anything I have fed back into the system.

 

The ST system is not concerned with "overworking themselves, commercialisation, narcissism, and a few other things", as Jim writes, fortunately. I direct all student's primary attention to what is happening in the body and in the mind now, and to concentrate on this. Thanks for posting this, Jim; interesting.

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To protect against instability in the sacroiliac joints, you need to (1) keep the core very tight, (2) not use the spine to put forces on the hips (e.g. dont pull the trunk forward with the arms to enhance your hamstring stretch), but instead make all the work come from WITHIN the pelvis, and (3) avoid certain moves that might twist or distract the joint (easier said than done).

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