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Found 11 results

  1. The term elderly doesn’t have a precise clinical definition, though it is often used in medical articles. Elderly has been used for older than 65 to older than 75, and some of us in the ST community are indeed getting older over time. Possibly coming into the definition of elderly at the age of 73, I do have an interest in exercises for older people. I also teach an ST class where the ages generally go from mid 60s to late 70s (though the oldest one has done yoga all her life and has enviable fitness and flexibility). Because it is a class of mixed fitness and abilities (some of whom are
  2. The title is a bit off I know, but I am old myself. As well as classes for younger people (splits and deep backbends for aerialists, dancers etc) I have a regular ST class which is now populated by people in their 60s to late 70s (the oldest in fact has enviable flexibility, having done yoga all her life). But they include quite a range of people – some are like her, others are working round arthritis, the after-effects of cancer treatment, and more. My ST class as well as including standard ST exercises is intended to address some of the issues that people come with. I have found the fol
  3. I initially came across Kit and Stretch Therapy in my quest to understand flexibility. Through much trial and error, then finally getting actual flexibility results myself that made sense, I think I found out what flexibility truly is. At least a far greater understanding of the mechanisms involved. Kit seemed to be one of the few people that aligned with my thought process. I browsed the forums and watched a few of his videos for further information. I found we didn’t completely agree on the topic but that is to be expected. The similarities and differences pushed me to reach o
  4. Hello, I need some advise here on strength training. My background is ballet dancing and swimming as a teenager, racquet games and yoga as a adult. I am pretty flexible, and have no problem getting into bridge, pancake, front and side splits. I have recently started Taiji and found that has improved my lower body strength substantially, not to mention stablisiing the knees. My problem is getting upper body strength. While practising yoga, I always have problems with stablising my hyper extended elbows in downdog and all the arms balancing poses. I can't do a downdog without feeling strain
  5. Quick background story: I injured (pulled) my right groin during partner stretch at the end of taekwondo class when i was 13years old. I was unable to land any weight on my right leg for few days and it really never healed well enough after that. I quited taekwondo for studies 15years old. On early twenties i went back to taekwondo, i had became very stiff while doing nothing meanwhile my studies (studied music as a pianist and sat all the time). At the begining i really didnt even remember my injured groin when i only focused how much i enjoyed just doing taekwondo even tho my leg d
  6. Highly off topic, but as a proud Dad who is the greatest non-sporty wimp possible, here is footage of the (Dutch) team my son trains, as basic athletic skills coach for the Netherlands Olympic committee. As he says "A lot of weights, focus on peak power and lower mileage: We're doing things differently & it's working" (listen to the commentary on their efficiency, explosive power and relaxed style).
  7. Greetings all, I’ve been observing the forums for years to be honest and I’ve come across a concept that I’d love some input on specifically from the Stretch Therapy forum perspective. Some of my interests at present are Gymnastics, parkour, grappling, qui gong, Pranayama, Parkour, olympic lifting, ballet, trying to grow facial hair and rock climbing. I have been researching different training methods used by Olympic Coach Charles Polliquin and stumbled across the fascinated idea that brain chemistry dominance will dictate an individual’s optimum training frequency. Secondly an individ
  8. This is a spill over thread for comments from a post in my Facebook group that is going crazy with good information. Some of us are using this year to Intensify footing and lower leg training, and see what good things occur. No 'formal protocol', though people will discuss individual protocols, exercises and observations. Personal responsibility is taken by all who join in and experiment. Please let us know if you discover something interesting! A lot of us have already noticed wide ranging benefits from this type of work. Some get bigger feet (*cough* Craig), other's have had no notice
  9. Holy moly; it's Autumn! I've always been interesting in seasonal rotation of exercise.. currently pondering what would work for Autumn (suggestions welcome). It does have a winding down towards winter feel to it, but I still want to enjoy training outside in the sun whilst it is still warm (and frankly Sydney gets nowhere near as cold as 'tha 'berra'). Training - keeping up the isometric work, which is going really well, but possibly not the TSC protocol for a month or two. Adding back in some more concentric/eccentric exercise.. Also, hopefully I will be adding in some thai pad rounds in on
  10. Late 2012/early 2013 training has been influenced heavily from a number of points that came home to me strongly during the 'Fundamentals of Human Movement' workshop that Steve Maxwell put on in Canberra late last year; and my own continuing exploration/dabbling in movement, mobility and body awareness. I've done some testing so I can mark progress throughout the year. Nothing too special; Chin-up max ( dead-hang and in good form); push-up; one-leg squat; broad jump; vertical jump. And some somatic markers, too. Basic strength work plus movement for a while yet; to condition before doing mo
  11. http://www.sandowplus.co.uk/ Lots of free passed-copyright books on Physical Culture. Great site, if you haven't already been there.
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