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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/09/2022 in all areas

  1. Hi Cameron, welcome! I second what Nathan said. I want to add that contractions can sometimes be a bit overwhelming. If one is new to a particular stretch or doesn't have a lot of experience with stretching, adding contractions might just be too much for certain individuals at times. So it really depends how it feels to YOU. With that being said, if you feel comfortable in a stretch, it doesn't harm to add some contractions. You can also experiment with how strong you contract.
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  2. Hi Cameron, Welcome to the forums! And glad to hear you're seeing some good results so far. I will start by saying there are really no hard-and-fast rules in ST... or in life, really! The guidance is to keep people safe and moving forward while they learn about their own body, needs, proclivities, etc. With that said, I'd rephrase what you said to clarify a bit - you want to limit the sessions that incorporate the intense stretching to once or twice per week. You may do the contractions several times within a session, and you might even use multiple stretches with contractions for the same part. That's all (potentially) fine, but you need that time between sessions for recovery and integration. That's where the real magic happens. Now, keeping that in mind, there are other considerations. What is the area? How strong were the contractions? How long were they held? How many repititions? Neck muscles are relatively small and weak, so you will generally be using weaker contractions, for shorter lengths, when compared to something like the quads. A smaller stressor will require less time for recovery and integration. In terms of weight lifting, this is why you can do bicep curls every other day but might only deadlift heavy once per week. So, that's a really long-winded way of saying "it depends," which is always the answer If you have enough body awareness to know that you need more, you might do the contractions in the follow-along class for any area you are working that day, which gives you more contraction work but equal recovery time. You could also modulate the intensity, length, and other variables of the contractions, if you feel confident doing so. But the safest bet would be to drop any extra contraction work. If you're doing your contraction work already, then you're making progress. Rushing is almost never a good idea, and the journey really is the goal, anyway!
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  3. Once you get past a certain point jefferson curls aren't going to do much to improve flexibility. They're great for joint prep and other stuff but not for developing flexibility past a certain point. The point of all these load flexibility/strength exercises is to make the new ranges more accessible and "functional" but we still need to use different methods to find these ranges and tight lines then use the right methods to strengthen them.
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